This question was answered on Thu 25, Nov 2010 07:36pm by Dr V

Can you describe how to trace a path from the right femoral vein to the lowerlobe of the right lung via the right pulmonary artery? Also cross the alveolarmembrane and trace route out of the body through the nose? I need thisinformation for my anatomy cla

    
Asked by junebug01 0 on Sat 30, Oct 2010 04:32pm
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Can you describe how to trace a path from the right femoral vein to the lower lobe of the right lung via the right pulmonary artery? Also cross the alveolar membrane and trace route out of the body through the nose? I need this information for my anatomy class, and am having a hard time finding articles about this topic. Possibly two or three recommended articles to look up would be helpful if you can do this for me. Thank you

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Answer by Dr V  on Thu 25, Nov 2010 07:36pm:

Hi The right femoral vein continues as the right external iliac vein which joins the inferior vena cava. From the inferior vena cava blood passes to the right atrium, then to right ventricle and to the right lung via the the right pulmonary artery. The blood in the pulmonary capillaries is subjected exchange of gases across the alveolar membrane. Gases exchange across the alveolar membrane into the alveoli, then to bronchioles, bronchii , trachea, larynx, pharynx, nose and then to the outside air. Hope this helps. Take care

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Comment by on Wed 16, Feb 2011 10:13pm:
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Comment by Dr Sanjivani Wanjari on Thu 17, Feb 2011 10:26pm:
Hi, welcome to this forum. like Dr Nishanth has described very well that the deoxygenated blood from the periphery is pushed from the femoral veins into the larger veins like the external iliac vessels and into the inferior vena cava and then into the right atrium of the heart. The blood that is returned to the right atrium is deoxygenated (poor in oxygen) blood and from the vena cava it enters the right atrium of the heart and flows through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle, from which it is pumped through the pulmonary valve into the pulmonary arteries which go to the lungs. The pulmonary arteries carry deoxygenated blood to the lungs. Pulmonary arteries are further divided into very fine branches called the capillaries which are very thin walled. The blood brings carbon dioxide from the rest of the body for release into the alveoli of the lungs. Pulmonary alveoli are the end cells of the respiratory tree. The alveolar membrane is the gas-exchange surface. The alveoli receive oxygen form the air during inhalation via the nose, trachea, bronchus and bronchioles. The oxygen in the alveoli is taken up by the blood in the alveolar blood vessels, to be transported to all the cells in the body. Pulmonary veins return the now oxygen-rich blood to the heart, where it enters the left atrium before flowing through the mitral valve into the left ventricle. Then, oxygen-rich blood from the left ventricle is pumped out via the aorta, and on to the rest of the body. Hope this helps. Take care and good luck.

Comment by Ervine Hoover on Sun 20, Feb 2011 10:28am:
Thank you so much for this information. I needed this for my Anatomy and Physiology Class.

Comment by Shoniqua Brown on Sat 30, Jul 2011 06:25pm:
I have this same question for my anatomy class. Thanks for the info!

Comment by Sarah on Tue 30, Aug 2011 02:24am:
I needed this for anatomy too. Thanks

Comment by Kayla on Sat 14, Apr 2012 11:58am:
Thank you so much for this answer. I thought I was doomed for failure when I seen the assignment from my anatomy and phisiolgy class.

Comment by MiKayla on Tue 17, Jul 2012 03:04pm:
Must have Dr. Tina McCleod for a professor..lol

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